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Educational Tracks
2015 AAP annual meeting education tracks

Creating the Future of Academic Physiatry Through Mentorship, Leadership & Discovery
March 10-14, 2015
Grand Hyatt San Antonio

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Educational Tracks

Educational Sessions include presentations, panels, and Q&A.  2015 educational sessions are arranged in uniform blocks of time so that the learner can easily jump tracks and design a customized agenda that best meets their individual needs.

Track A1: Electronic & Social Media in PM&R

Program Directors: Christopher J. Garrison, MD, MBA; Samuel M. Bierner, MD

There is an increasing use of Electronic and Social Media in research, medical education, patient care, and dissemination of Health Care Information.  Learn how to maximize the use, avoid the pitfalls, and explore the future of these applications. 

Track A1: Click here for details

Educational Sessions include presentations, panels, and Q&A.  2015 educational sessions are arranged in uniform blocks of time so that the learner can easily jump tracks and design a customized agenda that best meets their individual needs.

Track A1: Electronic & Social Media in PM&R

Program Directors: Christopher J. Garrison, MD, MBA; Samuel M. Bierner, MD

There is an increasing use of Electronic and Social Media in research, medical education, patient care, and dissemination of Health Care Information.  Learn how to maximize the use, avoid the pitfalls, and explore the future of these applications. 

Thursday, March 12, 2015
10:00 - 11:30 am

Social Media Connections in Academia

James T. McDeavitt, MD

(1) Describe how use of social media technologies create collaborations within and between academic departments.  (2) Discuss how clinical and academic processes spread within and between academic departments.  (3) Compare the processes and time needed to spread academic initiatives before and after the advent of social media. 

12:30 - 2:00 pm 

Using Social Media in Research: A Case Study of “Identifying Need for Supported Employment for Working Age Stroke Survivors: A Pilot Study”

Elizabeth A. Apple, MBA; John Humphreys, MS; Vu Q. C. Nguyen, MD

(1) Execute a research project using social media to advertise for and procure research subjects.  (2) Implement an online survey to collect the data and download the data into SAS for statistically analyzing the data.  (3) Explain how to maximize the use of social media for gathering research information and identify and reduce the pitfalls of using social media and survey monkey in research.   

4:00 - 5:30 pm

New Digital Communication Technologies: Improving Quality and Efficiency

Tim Gueramy, MD

(1) Describe how the use of new digital communication technologies to improve the safety of patient care.  (2) List the advantages of digital communication technologies in expediting urgent / emergent care.  (3) Explain how new digital communication technologies facilitate collaboration among clinicians.      

Friday, March 13, 2015
8:00 - 9:30 am

Educational Content Delivery Alternatives

Christopher J. Garrison, MD, MBA; Tim Gueramy, MD; James T. McDeavitt, MD

(1) List at least three new methods of delivering educational content using digital technologies.  (2) Describe how new educational content delivery alternatives facilitate collaboration among and between learners and educators.  (3) Characterize how educational content delivery alternatives concentrate expertise and improves access to clinical experts.


Track A2: Fundamentals & Applications of ICF

Program Directors: Maya R. Therattil, MD; Nitin B. Jain, MD, MSPH

Explore the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and discuss applications of the ICF including outcomes research, resident education, and integration into practice.

Track A2: Click here for details

Educational Sessions include presentations, panels, and Q&A. 

2015 educational sessions are arranged in uniform blocks of time so that the learner can easily jump tracks and design a customized agenda that best meets their individual needs.

Track A2: Fundamentals & Applications of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)

Program Directors: Maya Therattil, MD; Nitin B. Jain, MD, MSPH

Explore the domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and discuss applications of the ICF including outcomes research, resident education, and integration into practices.

Friday, March 13, 2015
12:45 - 2:15 pm

Introduction to ICF

Gerold Stucki, MD; Elliott Roth, MD; Walter R. Frontera, MD, PhD

(1) Describe the different domains of ICF.  (2) Indicate the need for use of ICF in the practice of PM&R.  (3) Compare ICF to other available classifications and evidence for the same.

3:00 - 4:30 pm

Outcomes Research Within the Framework of ICF

Manoj Sivan, MD; Gerold Stucki, MD

(1) Apply ICF as a tool to measure outcomes in research.  (2) Recognize the need for a reliable and validated rehabilitation outcomes measure.  (3) Explain psychometric properties of ICF. 

Saturday, March 14, 2015
10:00 - 11:30 am

Using ICF to Enhance PM&R Resident and Medical Student Education: Why and How?

John L.Melvin, MD, MMSc; Scott Campea, MD; Nethra Ankam, MD

(1) Describe why the ICF framework should be used to enhance PM&R resident and medical student Education.  (2) Identify facilitators and barriers to using the ICF framework to support student and resident learning.  (3) Formulate one sample learning goald that can be supported by utilizing the ICF framework.

11:45 am - 1:15 pm

Integrating ICF into Your Research and Practice: Practical Tips

Nitin B Jain, MD, MSPH; Maya Therattil, MD

(1) Use IFC in providing evidence based clinical care.  (2) Prepare research grant proposals using ICF.  (3) Design a research study using ICF as an outcome measure.


Track B1: Occupational Rehabilitation for Injured Workers: It's Not as Hard as You Think

Program Directors: Justin T. Hata, MD; Vu Q.C. Nguyen, MD

Describe how patients with disabilities can return to work by synthesizing knowledge from quantitative evidence about interventions that have been found to be effective in improving return-to-work and stay-at-home outcomes in workers with cognitive, physical, or behavioral impairments.

Track B1: Click here for details

Educational Sessions include presentations, panels, and Q&A. 

2015 educational sessions are arranged in uniform blocks of time so that the learner can easily jump tracks and design a customized agenda that best meets their individual needs.

Track B1: Occupational Rehabilitation for Injured Workers: It's Not as Hard as You Think

Program Directors: Justin T. Hata, MD; Vu Nguyen, MD

Describe how patients with disabilities can return to work by synthesizing knowledge from quantitative evidence about interventions that have found to be effective in improving return-to-work and stay-at-home outcomes in workers with cognitive, physical, or behavioral impairments. 

Thursday, March 12, 2015
10:00 - 11:30 am

Occupational Rehabilitation: Why, How and What to Teach in a PM&R Residency

Russell Gelfman, MD, MS; James J. Hall, MD, MPH; Robert D. Rondinelli, MD, PhD

(1) Review the similarities between PM&R and occupational medicine, the decline in occupational medicine residency programs, and the need to teach other specialists about occupational medicine.  (2) Compare and contrast Program Requirements and Milestones between PM&R and preventive (Occupational) medicine.  (3) Identify areas where clinical and research aspects of Occupational & Environmental medicine can be integrated in a PM&R curriculum.  (4) Review the principles, terminology, and definitions of disablement with attention to their specific applications to the processes of impairment rating and disability determinations for Workers’ Compensation.  

12:30 - 2:00 pm
Impairment Rating and Independent Medical Examination

Robert D. Rondinelli, MD, PhD

(1) Recognize the preferred rating method and apply the appropriate procedural guides to rating permanent impairment for Workers’ Compensation claims settlement.  (2) Identify the two major changes for the AMA Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment, and explain their importance to PM&R.  (3) Define and list four key components of Independent Medical Examination.  (4) Compare and contracts the following terms: medical possibility vs. probability; exacerbation vs. aggravation; causality vs. apportionment; work ability vs. restrictions; permanency.  

4:00 - 5:30 pm
Occupational Sports Performance Model for Work Injury Rehabilitation

James J. Hill, III, MD, MPH

(1) Review the different treatment and rehabilitation options for injured athletes and injured workers.  (2) Identify current gaps and problems with existing therapy models for the rehabilitation of industrial and tactical athletes.  (3) Discuss the literature on specialized sports rehabilitation procedures, such as the AlterG (anti-gravity treadmill), hydrotherapy and underwater treadmills and their potential role in rehabilitation of industrial athletes.  

Friday, March 13, 2015
8:00 - 9:30 am

Early Intervention for Delayed Recovery

Russell Gelfman, MD, MS

(1) Discuss how to identify delayed recovery in the injured worker.  (2) Compare the concepts of work conditioning and work hardening.  (3) Develop an interdisciplinary program for early intervention.


Track B2: Practice Exercise Prescriptions

Program Directors: Erik S. Brand, MD, MSc

Learn how to integrate exercise into practice and develop appropriate prescriptions into practice that considers the patients' health status, impairments, nutritional intake, abilities, preferences, and resources.  Discuss strategies for improving exercise adherence.

Track B2: Click here for details

Educational Sessions include presentations, panels, and Q&A. 

2015 educational sessions are arranged in uniform blocks of time so that the learner can easily jump tracks and design a customized agenda that best meets their individual needs.

Track B2: Practical Exercise Prescription

Program Director: Erik S. Brand, MD, MSc

Learn how to integrate exercise prescription into practice and develop appropriate prescriptions that considers the patients’ health status, impairments, nutritional intake, abilities, preferences, resources and k now strategies for improving exercise adherence. 

Friday, March 13, 2015
12:45 - 2:15 pm

Comprehensive Exercise Prescription

Roger Mignosa, DO

(1) Differentiate risk for the initiation of an exercise program.  (2) Indicate appropriate testing required to begin an exercise program.  (3) Describe the elements of an exercise prescription.  (4) Identify the principles of training from progression, to overload, to specificity and more.  (5) Explain the components of strength, flexibility, cardiovascular exercise and body awareness.  

3:00 - 4:30 pm

Integrating Exercise into the Stroke Rehabilitation Program

Vu Q.C. Nguyen, MD, MBA; J. George Thomas, MD; Tiffany Ford, MS, OTR/L; Mary Beth Kerstein, MS, CCC-SLP

(1) Distinguish the common stroke complications and deficits that contribute to functional and mobility impairment.  (2) Review the current evidence behind therapeutic exercise and how to address stroke complications and deficits in the practice of stroke rehabilitation.  (3) Examine emerging and promising approaches to integrate exercise into neuroplastic recruitment and training.  (4) Delineate the optimal therapeutic exercise approach for various stroke complications and deficits.    

Saturday, March 14, 2015
10:00 - 11:30 am

Prescribing Exercises for Cancer Patients

R. Samuel Mayer, MD; Vishwa Raj, MD; Brittany Lorden, OT; Joanna Edekar, PT

(1) Explain the epidemiology and cost of cancer related disability.  (2) Describe the evidence basis for cancer rehabilitation and pre-habilitation programs.  (3) Identify key functional limitations in common cancer diagnoses.  (4) Write rehabilitation prescriptions that address specific impairments and provide appropriate precautions.      

11:45 am - 1:15 pm

How to Effectively Teach and Prescribe Foundational Strength Exercises

Jamia Erickson, Med, CSCS; Karl Erickson, BSc, CSCS

(1) Identify essential universal human movement patterns for foundational strength development.  (2) Express the benefits of movement preparation.  (3) Recognize essential periodization concepts.  (4) Develop strategies that encourage patient compliance.        


Track C1: Ultrasound in Education and Research

Program Directors: Joseph E. Herrera, DO; Christopher J. Visco, MD

Explore the use of ultrasound in medical education and research, at the medical school, resident, and post residency levels.

Track C1: Click here for details

Educational Sessions include presentations, panels, and Q&A.  2015 educational sessions are arranged in uniform blocks of time so that the learner can easily jump tracks and design a customized agenda that best meets their individual needs.

Track C1: Ultrasound in Education and Research

Program Directors: Joseph Herrera, DO; Christopher J. Visco, MD

Explore the use of ultrasound in medical education and research at the medical school, resident, and post residency levels.  

Thursday, March 12, 2015
10:00 - 11:30 am

Ultrasound Elastography: Research and Clinical Applications for Real-Time Measurements of Muscle Mechanical Properties

Joline E. Bradenburg, MD; Sarah F. Eby, MD / PhD Candidate; Pengfei Song, PhD; Wenchun Qu, MD, PhD

(1) Recognize gaps in current knowledge and research techniques for clinical musculoskeletal research and describe the general principles of Ultrasound Elastography.  (2) Summarize the strengths and limitations of differing Ultrasound Elastography techniques for evaluating muscle.  (3) Discuss research and clinical applications of Ultrasound Elastography for measuring muscle

12:30 - 2:00 pm 
Musculoskeletal Ultrasound: A Milestone Based Approach to Enhance the Education of Anatomy and Physical Exam

Arthur Jason De Luigi, DO; Eric Wisotzky, MD; Bryan Murtaugh, MD

(1) Define the benefits of musculoskeletal ultrasound in the education of the musculoskeletal system.  (2) Integrate musculoskeletal ultrasound into residency education to assist in the Milestone Base Education.  (3) Describe normal neuromusculoskeletal tissue and differentiate to pathologic findings.

4:00 - 5:30 pm
The Role of Ultrasound in the EMG Laboratory

Andrea Boon, MD; Jeffrey Strommen, MD

(1) List two nerve conduction studies where ultrasound visualization of the nerve can improve the quality of the study.  (2) Recite two patient factors that could make accurate needle EMG placement more difficult.  (3) Identify the diaphragm on a sonogram of the chest wall.  (4) Recognize three high risk muscles in which EMG needle placement is safer using real time ultrasound guidance.  

Friday, March 13, 2015
8:00 - 9:30 am

Advances in Ultrasound Education and Application

Christopher J. Visco, MD; David Spinner, DO; Joseph Herrera, DO

(1) Develop strategies to implement ultrasound into anatomy education and the role of cadavers.  (2) Describe the uses of ultrasound in education with regard to regenerative medicine.  (3) Explain the use of an ultrasound workbook.  (4) Review current technology and learning opportunities (Apps, web based learning, etc.)


Track C2: Neuroplasticity and Regenerative Medicine: Research to Clinical Practice

Program Directors: Emerald Lin, MD; Mooyeon Oh-Park, MD

Neuroplasticity and regeneration are the basis for resiliency of the neural and musculoskeletal systems, providing the foundation for repair, regrowth, and functional adaptation to injury.  Learn about the latest advances in neuroplasticity and regenerative medicine from basic and clinical research to evidence-based and patient-centered clinical practice.

Track C2: Click here for details

Educational Sessions include presentations, panels, and Q&A. 

2015 educational sessions are arranged in uniform blocks of time so that the learner can easily jump tracks and design a customized agenda that best meets their individual needs.

Track C2: Neuroplasticity and Regeneration Medicine: Research to Clinical Practice

Program Directors: Emerald Lin, MD; Mooyeon Oh-Park, MD

Neuroplasticity and regeneration are the basis for resiliency of the neural and musculoskeletal systems, providing the foundation for repair, regrowth, and functional adaptation to injury.  Learn about the latest advances in neuroplasticity and regenerative medicine from basic and clinical research to evidence-based and patient-centered clinical practice.    

Friday, March 13, 2015
12:45 - 2:15 pm

Stroke Rehabilitation: Thinking Out of the Box

John Chae, MD, ME; Richard Harvey, MD; Preeti Raghavan, MD

(1) Discuss recent advancements in the application of electrical stimulation in shoulder pain among stroke survivors.  (2) Explain the role of neuromodulation in motor recovery post stroke.  (3) Recognize the potential utilization of auditory stimulation (e.g. music) in stroke rehabilitation based on its impact on neuroplasticity.  

3:00 - 4:30 pm

Spinal Cord Injury: Updates in Neuromodulation, Thought Control, and Clinical Trials

Steve Kirshblum, MD; Steve Williams, MD; W. Jerry Mysiw, MD

(1) Describe neuromodulation (e.g. spinal cord stimulation) for neural recovery after spinal cord injury.  (2) Recognize the advances in brain machine interface and recent application and functional impact in patients with spinal cord injury.  (3) Report the status of recent clinical trials based on basic research findings in rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injury.

Saturday, March 14, 2015
10:00 - 11:30 am

Traumatic Brain Injury: Stress, Neuroplasticity, and Recovery

Heechin Chae, MD; Maulik Purohit, MD; Emerald Lin, MD

(1) Evaluate the possible causes of the 20% of the MTBI patients who do not improve or have a protracted recovery.  (2) Explain the physiology and science of stress in MTBI injury and recovery.  (3) Discuss the model of an outpatient medical home with interdisciplinary evaluation and treatment for best functional and medical outcomes.  (4) Recognize and assess neuroimaging as an integral portion of diagnosis and a tool to assess neuroplasticity in recovery.

11:45 am - 1:15 pm

Musculoskeletal Medicine: Biologics, Regenerative Medicine and Aging

Steven Sampson, DO; Gwendolyn A. Sowa, MD; Jonathan Bean, MD, MPH

(1) Differentiate types of regenerative medicine techniques including biologic: stem cell from adipose tissue and bone marrow sources, platelet rich plasma, and whole blood.  (2) Compare methods of translating research into clinical practice to improve rehabilitation and outcomes for mobility in our aging population.  (3) Evaluate the evidence base for current practices with regenerative medicine and the areas of need for future research.


Administrative Directors Track - PM&R Administration

Program Directors: Matthew B. Huish, MBS

Discuss critical and timely topics specific to academically based PM&R programs.  Administrative directors will participate in additional activities and educational sessions that may not be outlined in the brochure.  View the AAP website for the most up to date schedule.

Administrative Directors Track: Click here for details

Administrative Directors Track - PM&R Administration

Program Directors: Matthew B. Huish, MBA

The Administrative Directors Track is subject to change.  A finalized schedule will be posted as soon as available. 

Population Health Management

(1) Understand the comprehensive definition and responsibilities of PHM. (2) Appreciate the key variables of managing populations.  (3) Sub-specialty PHM opportunities in PM&R.  (4) Learn steps in how to strategically and proactively manage clinical and financial opportunities while improving health outcomes and reducing costs.

Service Line Integration

Matthew B. Huish, MBA; John Behzad, MBA

(1) How to begin managing integration across the rehab continuum.  (2) Developing and maintaining big picture focus vs. unit focus. (3) Building key relationships with acute services.  (3) Understanding key variables, i.e., earlier/more timely transfers, sicker patients, quality impact, etc.  (4) Considering various consult service models

Post Acute Continuum & Readmissions Strategy

Camden Group

(1) Understand PAC components.  (2) Identifying the key considerations for determining a PAC strategy. (3) Determining PAC financial implications. (4) How to perform a market analysis to identify PAC strategic partners based on patient needs/discharge data (volume & diagnoses), geography, and quality outcomes. (5) Managing communication and data sharing across the PAC    

Building Bundles: Nuts and Bolts

(1) Understand how the Innovation Center, created by the Affordable Care Act, has been tasked with creative payment and service delivery models that have the potential to reduce Medicare, Medicaid, or Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) expenditures while preserving or enhancing the quality of care for beneficiaries.  (2) Identify various characteristics of the four bundled models.  (3) Learn how to model, (financially and clinically) your practice to ensure success under episodes of care.

Value Based Purchasing - Paying for Quality Outcomes

Bob Pendelton

(1) Understand the ‘Value’ imperative & associated drivers of our current national health system performance.  (2) Understand CMS Value Based Purchasing payment and operational details, including measures, performance periods, performance standards and domain weighting.  (3) Review specific strategies to improve value at the system level.  (4) Translate these strategies to clinical practice 

How Academic PM&R programs can reconfigure within ACOs 

Robert Rondinelli, MD, PhD

(1) Using FIM-based metrics with stroke patients to show high correlations with the FIM itself and high internal consistency between post-acute venue’s.  (2) Discussion of patient-centered longitudinal outcomes from acute through post-acute until exiting the ‘episode of care’ within a single uniform continuum.  (3) Review the correlation of acute functionality with overall cost per EOC and compare differences in cost vs functionality per EOC when IRF vs SNF pathways are used.  (4) How to apply a new metric for burden-of-care as well to other patient populations/groups.

Transforming Operational and Quality Discovery into Published Research 

Pamela Roberts, PhD, CPHQ; Richard Riggs, MD

(1) Identify the steps from taking an idea to a published article.  (2) Increase awareness of the difference between quality findings/data and research.  (3) Discuss the collaboration and strategies for translation of rehabilitation operational issues into published articles. 

Healthcare Reform Update - What's coming/when, and its potential impact on PM&R

(1) Understand key change factors occuring in health care reform their impact on rehabilitation medicine.  (2) Identify strategic sources to access for tracking inpending changes and their potential implications on core business.  (3) Evaluate your status relative to reform initiatives.  (4) Consider a strategic plan for new opportunities

New Business Opportunities

(1) Discussion on new business opportunities in rehabilitation medicine.  (2) Understanding on the start up costs, operations and success factors involved in a new line of business.  (3) Evaluate finanical modeling to assess return on investment of new business

Social Media - Presenting to the Market & Patients

(1) Develop a familiarity on the definition of social media in medicine and in PM&R.  (2) Obtain knowledge of how to use social media for educating residents. (3) Evaluate the use of social media for one's practice.  (4) Plan how to integrate social media into patient care and compare the cost benefits of social media in one's practice

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Creating the future of academic physiatry through mentorship, leadership, and discovery.

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