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2015 AAP annual meeting program

Creating the Future of Academic Physiatry Through Mentorship, Leadership & Discovery
March 10-14, 2015
Grand Hyatt San Antonio

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AAP 2015 covers a broad spectrum of cutting edge topics from science to practice.  The meeting is packed with educational activities including educational sessions, cutting-edge keynote and plenary sessions, hands on workshops, and scientific paper presentations along with over 300 poster board presentations showcasing the finest scientific innovations and research.

   

Featured Speakers

  • James T. McDeavitt, MD
  • Susan J. Harkema, PhD
  • Kathryn A. Stolp, MD
  • Mark Nivet, EdD, MBA

james mcdeavittThursday, March 12
8:00 - 8:45 am

Monday Morning: Ten Little Things

by James T. McDeavitt, MD

The "ten little things" are relatively simple actions you can start on Monday morning to better position yourself and your organization for the future. 

Dr. James McDeavitt, a recognized leader in educational, research and clinical programs, was named chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Baylor College of Medicine effective January 1, 2014. Shortly thereafter, he also assumed responsibility for clinical business development for the college.  Dr. McDeavitt came to Baylor from the Carolinas Health System where he led a substantial expansion of the academic mission of that organization.  Dr. McDeavitt received his medical degree from the Bowman Gray School of Medicine in Wake Forest University and, following a year of medical missionary work in rural Guatemala, completed his residency training in PM&R at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, where he served as Chief resident.

Description:

Health care in the United States is in a period of transformational change.  Given the magnitude and complexity of the change, it is easy to be overwhelmed by the challenge faced by physicians and rehabilitation professionals.  In this presentation, major reform dynamics will be summarized and used as a context for practical things health care leaders can do today to prepare for the future.  The “ten little things” are relatively simple actions you can start on Monday morning to better position yourself and your organization for the future.

Objectives:

  1. Summarize major trends in health care reform. 
  2. From the perspective of rehabilitation medicine, articulate the difference between the “DRG-driven reform” of the 1980’s and the “Value-based reform” of the 2010’s. 
  3. Develop at least one concrete action, for immediate implementation, to prepare for the future.  This action may relate to personal development, organizational cultural preparation or logistical preparation.

susan harkemaThursday, March 12
8:45 - 9:30 am


Reawakening Limbs: Advances in Stimulation and Locomotor Training Following Spinal Cord Injury

by Susan J. Harkema, PhD

Dr. Harkema's research is focused on understanding neural mechanisms responsible for human locomotion and the level of plasticity - or the ability to change and recover - after neurological injury. 

Dr. Susan Harkema, is professor, rehabilitation research director of the University of Louisville’s Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center and the director of research at Frazier Rehab Institute. She is also the director of the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation’s Neurorecovery Network.  Dr. Harkema came to University of Louisville from UCLA where she was an assistant professor in the department of neurology and the Brain Research Institute.  A graduate of Michigan State University, Dr. Harkema earned her BS and PhD in physiology and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in neurology at the University of California, LA. 

Description:

Dr. Harema’s research is focused on understanding neural mechanisms responsible for human locomotion and the level of plasticity – or the ability to change and recover – after neurologic injury.  She and her colleagues have developed an intervention called locomotor training that reteaches walking by providing sensory cues the neural circuitry of the spinal cord recognizes and promotes better muscle patterns for walking. The results of these studies contribute to the knowledge about the fundamental mechanisms that control human location; this may provide strategies physiatrists can use for walking rehabilitation after neurological injury occurs. 

Objectives:

  1. Discuss the role that activity-dependent plasticity plays in recovery. 
  2. Describe case studies of patients who have been tested with epidural stimulators. 
  3. Explore the barriers and benefits of locomotor research translation to clinical relevance.

kathryn stolpFriday, March 13
10:00 - 10:45 am


AAP Presidential Address


by Kathryn A. Stolp, MD

Dr. Stolp is the current President of the Association of Academic Physiatrists.  Her Presidential Address will touch on AAP's history, describe the changes that have occurred to date, and share AAP's vision for the future of academic physiatry. 

Dr. Kathryn Stolp is Associate Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and has been at Mayo Clinic Rochester since 1991 with joint appointments in the departments of PM&R and Neurology.  She served as PM&R department chair for eight years, as the Director of the Mayo Clinic Spinal Cord Injury Program, Mayo PM&R residency program director, and as Associate Dean in the Mayo School for Graduate Medical Education.  She is presently the Medical Director for the Doctorate in Physical Therapy Program, Mayo School of Health Systems. She is former president of the American Association of Neurolmuscular and Electrodiagnositc Medicine and is currently chair of the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine. Her research interests include healthcare costs for the disabled, spasticity management, and neuromuscular disease.  Dr. Stolp received her MD degree from the University of Minnesota and trained in PM&R residency followed by a fellowship in Neuromuscular Disease and Electromyography at the University of Michigan.  She also received a Masters of Science degree in Clinical Research Design and Experimental Analysis from the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health. 

Description:

Dr. Stolp is the current President of the Association of Academic Physiatrists.  Her Presidential Address will touch on AAP’s history, describe the changes that have occurred to date, and share AAP’s vision for the future of academic physiatry.

Objectives:

  1. Discuss the history of AAP’s origination and development. 
  2. Outline the changes that have occurred to date. 
  3. Explore the AAP vision for the future of academic physiatry.

marc nevittSaturday, March 14
9:00 - 9:45 am 


Delisa Lecture: Diversity and Inclusion in Academic Medicine

by Mark Nivet, EdD, MBA

This presentation will focus on the evolution of diversity paradigms and the importance of building capacity for academic medicine to move diversity from the periphery to the core of the institution to advance health equity.

Mark Nivet joined the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) in June as chief diversity officer.  In that role, Mr. Nivet provides strategic vision for all the AAMC’s diversity and inclusion activities and leads the association’s diversity policy and programs department, which focuses on programs designed to increase diversity in medical education and advance health care equity.  Mr. Nivet has dedicated his career to improving higher education by creating and supporting initiatives that increase diversity.  As the associate executive director of the Associated Medical Schools of New York for seven years, he oversaw programs designed to increase enrollment and retention of minority students in the health professions.  Most recently, Mr. Nivet served as chief operating officer of the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation, where he oversaw day-to-day operations of the foundation and managed an endowment of $150 million.  The foundation supports programs designed to improve the education of health professionals in the interest of public health.

Description:

It is an exciting time for diversity in academic medicine.  A growing appreciation for diversity and inclusion as drivers of excellence is coupled with the charge of building and sustaining the capacity to positively affect health care for all.  Realizing these goals requires engaging individuals with different perspectives, skills, and experiences.  In particular, a broader concept of diversity and a climate of inclusion is essential for institutions to move from the paradigm of recruitment and retention to one of attraction and thriving.  This presentation will focus on the evolution of diversity paradigms and the importance of building capacity for academic medicine to move diversity from the periphery to the core of the institution to advance health equity.

Objectives:

  1. Explore the evolution of diversity paradigms, from an issue of social justice to a driver of institutional excellence. 
  2. Connect diversity and inclusion to attraction and thriving of students and faculty. 
  3. Understand the value of diversity in improving quality of care. 
  4. Elevate the discourse around diversity and inclusion in academic medicine.

AAP's Mission

Creating the future of academic physiatry through mentorship, leadership, and discovery.

Contact Us

Association of Academic Physiatrists
10461 Mill Run Circle, Suite 730
Owings Mills, MD 21117
P. 410.654.1000 F. 410.654.1001

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